KILLOE YOUNG EMMETS - KILLOE ÓG - KILLOE LADIES
KILLOE GAA

Club Identity

Club Name

The origins of the GAA in Killoe date back to 1889 and the formation of the first club in the Parish called Killoe Erins Hopes. The club name quickly changed to Killoe Erins Pride and the club participated in the first Senior Football Championship in 1890. A short time later a second club was formed in the parish called Killoe McMahons, with both clubs participated in the unfinished 1891 Senior Football Championship. The McMahons club is no longer referenced after 1892 while Erins Pride is found in challenge matches up to 1896.

The Killoe Young Emmets club name first appeared in 1903. The timing of the emergence of the club name in late 1903 suggests a link to the 100th anniversary of the death of Robert Emmet which was commemorated across Ireland in September and October 1903, just prior to the first reference to the club name in published records in December 1903. It's unclear whether this was a revival of one of the two clubs which existed previously in the parish.

The club is also referred to by the Irish version of Emmet Óg since the late 1950's (strictly speaking the Irish translation of Killoe Young Emmets is 'Na hEiméid Óga Cill Eo'). This use of an Irish version of the name began around 1958 when club notes in the local newspapers started to appear with the club name in Irish, reputedly the result of an Irish language initiative by the County Board secretary of the day. This expanded to club names appearing 'As Gaeilge' in fixtures too by the end of the 1950's and into the 1960's. The Irish version stuck for a couple of clubs in particular, including Killoe, who started to be referred to more regularly in print in the 1960's as Emmet Óg even after most other clubs had reverted back to their original naming convention in published records. For Killoe, this somewhat confusing dual-naming convention has continued to this day.

All records prior to the early 1960's exclusively referred to the club name as Killoe Young Emmets, while Emmet Óg began to be used interchangeably with Killoe Young Emmets in the 1960's and 1970's, with a mixture of Emmet Óg or Killoe Young Emmets used during the 1980's and 1990's, and Killoe Emmet Óg used as a variant of the club name in the 2000's.

The underage section of the club is called Killoe Óg while the Ladies Club is called Killoe.

Club Crest

The Killoe GAA club crest was introduced in 2012 and replaced the previous design which had existed since 1991. The club crest was created in conjunction with LD2 (Laird Designs) and was commissioned and gifted to the club by a local family. It first appeared on Killoe jerseys during the Senior Football Championship in August 2012 and now appears on all Killoe GAA jerseys, flags and merchandise.

The Killoe name derives from the Irish Cill Eo meaning Church of the Yew Tree. The yew tree (Eo in Irish) in abstract form is central to the crest design, set in front of the cross, reflecting the church (Cill in Irish) and the spiritual heritage of the community. The name of the parish in Irish 'Cill Eo', is set above the Irish form of the county, 'An Longfort'. Gaelic Games under GAA rules in Killoe can be traced back to 1889 and the foundation of the first club in the parish, and this historic note is reflected within the design.

The GAA insignia appears at the base of the crest for Killoe Young Emmets and Killoe Óg purposes, while the LGFA insignia appears at the base of the crest for Killoe Ladies purposes. The colours of white and green that dominate the crest are those worn by all Killoe teams. For branding purposes (i.e. jerseys, training gear, flags, letterhead), the respective names of club sections in Irish or English such as ‘Emmet Óg’ or ‘Killoe Óg’ or ‘Killoe Ladies’ can be added as separate text beneath the crest in Brushtip-C font.

Killoe GAA

Branding Script

Killoe LGFA

Crest Downloads

Killoe GAA Crest:
Large PNG (for Digital) - here
Large PDF (for Print) - here

Killoe LGFA Crest:
Large PNG (for Digital) - here
Large PDF (for Print) - here

Branding Script:
Brushtip Font (free) - here